Learning Child

Young children learn best through activities that are relevant to their lives and varied enough to be challenging and engaging. Children develop their knowledge by building on their past experiences and the learning they have already acquired. Since most children believe that learning is a pleasurable experience, they are naturally inclined and even eager to learn when they first come to school.

Each child grows and develops in various interrelated areas – physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and linguistic. In order to address the full range of each child’s developmental needs, the Kindergarten program should provide opportunities for learning, self-expression, and selfdiscovery in a variety of areas – for example, in music, drama, games, language activities, and cooperative activities with peers.

Children develop at different rates and in different ways. Each child is unique and has individual needs. Some children will benefit more from one type of teaching strategy than another; some may need more time than others, and/or additional resources, to achieve the learning expectations.

In addition, the diverse cultural and linguistic realities of the children contribute to variations in the ways in which they develop and demonstrate their learning. Children therefore need opportunities to learn in an appropriate manner and at an appropriate time in their development, and need to be given learning experiences that are within the range of things they can do with and without guidance.